The #ReimagineFORUM @ Discipleship.Network

Equipping Your Reimagine Journey

Why does the Church?

Why do Pastors ... Church Leaders ...

Small Group Directors ... Youth/Children Workers ...?

Need to Reimagine Discipleship?

Scroll for commentary and content 

Views: 441

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

In your interview format there is this segment:

  • What roadblocks or resistance, barriers and boundaries, inhibit or prevent leaders from pursuing a discernment-assessment when they commence a journey to re-imagine ministry?

-Fear

-Assuming beneficial models/modes from the past are eternal; untouchable.

-Inability to wait; ask, be silent-listen-hear, then obey.

-Unwillingness to be coached by the Holy Spirit.

-Flying solo; my plan, my way.

-Relying on successful leaders/models while not making oneself accountable to a community (cohort group, leadership team, church wide prayer and deliberation).

-Better at listing (petitions) than listening (perceiving by the Spirit God’s Word and will).

The highlighted item above was Brought to my attention.  It has always been taught to me that a Christian cannot be a "Lone Ranger."  Is this a "church teaching" that must be overcome to be a Re-imaginer?  And if one becomes such a "solo-flyer," isn't God his Co-pilot?

 

Remember ...

Even the Lone Ranger had a trusted partner in Tonto ... and he often teamed up with local groups of of citizens who were 

devoted to doing good,

Phil



Richard H. Skiba, Jr. said:

  It has always been taught to me that a Christian cannot be a "Lone Ranger."  Is this a "church teaching" that must be overcome to be a Re-imaginer?  And if one becomes such a "solo-flyer," isn't God his Co-pilot?

 

Amen! to listening that if Scripture-fed and Spirit led!

Phil

Curator/Coordinator

I understand Ke-mo sah-re-imaginer.

Praise God for all the emerging re-imaginers who are devoted to doing His Good,

 

Network Creator / Coordinator said:

Remember ...

Even the Lone Ranger had a trusted partner in Tonto ... and he often teamed up with local groups of of citizens who were 

devoted to doing good,

Phil



Richard H. Skiba, Jr. said:

  It has always been taught to me that a Christian cannot be a "Lone Ranger."  Is this a "church teaching" that must be overcome to be a Re-imaginer?  And if one becomes such a "solo-flyer," isn't God his Co-pilot?

 

I think the "Lone Ranger" idea is the results of incomplete concept of evangelism that only emphasizes the a profession of faith as the goal and not the spiritual birth of a new creature. It is not so much overcoming the idea that the "gospel" is a transaction that allows to escape hell because by our profession of faith we get credit for Jesus' sacrifice. Such an understanding means a person can be saved and never become a part of the body of Christ because all that is involved to an agreement between him or her and God. That interpretation is a product of modern evangelism and is not the full gospel proclaimed by Jesus recorded in the four gospels. 



Richard H. Skiba, Jr. said:

I understand Ke-mo sah-re-imaginer.

Praise God for all the emerging re-imaginers who are devoted to doing His Good,

 

Network Creator / Coordinator said:

Remember ...

Even the Lone Ranger had a trusted partner in Tonto ... and he often teamed up with local groups of of citizens who were 

devoted to doing good,

Phil



Richard H. Skiba, Jr. said:

  It has always been taught to me that a Christian cannot be a "Lone Ranger."  Is this a "church teaching" that must be overcome to be a Re-imaginer?  And if one becomes such a "solo-flyer," isn't God his Co-pilot?

 

Clearly Gary E. Blackwell is a Re-imaginer.    He recognizes that some of modern Evangelism is all about obtaining professions for Christ.  In the same way, some of the building of bricks and mortar congregations is all about putting “fannies” in the pews.  Thus, when the hearts of those new “professors” and new “members” do not change, the Gospel is not fulfilled.

 

A question I have frequently heard in modern Christianity is, “How many people have you brought to Christ?”  Anyone who states a number greater than zero needs to confess false testimony (John 15:16).

 

As to “flying solo" or being a “Lone Ranger,” that only means that when one becomes a Re-imaginer of Christianity, one may not initially be embraced by fellow Christian leaders.  This is apparently necessary.  It seems to emulate the example of the GREATEST LEADER of Christianity.

10 CRITICAL QUESTIONS FOR CHANGE LEADERS

Guest Post by Carol Kinsey Goman, Ph.D.


Two or three years ago I read a news story about an executive who had been hired to turn around the fortunes of a business that was on the rocks. The product was bad. Morale was awful. Management appeared to be confused about what to do. And customers were staying away in droves.

Clearly, this fellow had been hired to make changes, and here’s what he said: “We gotta shake this place up and keep shaking until we get it right.”

He was a change manager, to be sure. He had been brought in because things were not working well and somebody had to make miracles happen quickly. And our guy did that in spades, firing middle managers with abandon, reversing policies that had served the organization well and establishing immediately that he was king. It worked—for a while. The operation seemed to take on a new focus, and customers returned. The product got better. Management relaxed and the teamwork that everyone had hoped for seemed to emerge once again. That’s the good news.

But I used that word “teamwork” advisedly because this organization indeed was a team, a minor-league baseball club in a large Southern city. Sports franchises make great cases for the study of change management because the results show up so quickly.

In this case, the “shaking up” of the organization worked for slightly less than one season and the new manager was summarily relieved even as his bravado still seemed to echo off the locker room walls. He was a bold manager of change, to be sure, but he was not a skilled one.

The lesson of this man’s forceful and narrow-minded attack on the company he set out to correct is critical for corporate managers: change cannot be mandated or forced. It has many constituents and these constituents count. Change managers need to ask themselves some difficult questions before they set out to “shake things up.” And they must listen to the answers.

If you are a sensitive change manager, here are some of the questions you must consider before you set out to make things better.

1. What is the employees’ perspective?

To mobilize a work force to transform itself, leaders must know what people in the organization are thinking, encourage them to articulate their points of view and their concerns and be ready to respond to them sincerely. Don’t rely on second-hand information or make assumptions about what you think employees think. Ask them—and keep asking them until the answer becomes clear. Only then can you begin to design a strategy that builds on synergies and fills in perception gaps.

2. Did you “set the stage” for change?

One of the most vital roles of leadership is to anticipate the corporation’s future and its place in the global arena, and then to formulate strategies for surmounting challenges that have not yet manifested. To proactively respond to these challenges, businesses must continually reinvent themselves. Leaders must encourage employees to join a constant questioning of the prevailing business assumptions—and to be ready to act upon new opportunities early in the game to maintain a competitive advantage.

3. Are you tracking employee perceptions throughout the change?

As important as it is to find out what employees are thinking before the change, it is just as crucial to have a system for monitoring employee perception throughout the process. George Bernard Shaw once said that the problem with communication is “the illusion that it has been accomplished.” When it comes to communicating change, leadership must be especially careful not to suffer that illusion. Strategies that include employee interaction and feedback systems help organizations track the level of work force comprehension. You will find the greatest advantages come when organizational feedback is gathered immediately after the delivery of every important message. One of my clients uses this short questionnaire to query her audiences before they leave the meeting room:

  • What in your view are the most important points we just covered?
  • What didn’t you understand?
  • With what do you disagree?
  • With what do you agree?
  • What else do you need to know?

4. Are you giving honest answers to tough questions?

In the light of economic realities that offer little in the way of job security, employees must be able to rely on their employers to give them honest information that will allow them to make informed choices about their own jobs, careers and futures. When you can’t answer every question, it is best to tell people that you understand their concern but don’t know the answer. Or, say that you don’t have the information yet, but will get back to them as soon as decisions are made. It is even better to tell people that you have the information but can’t release it than to withhold or twist the truth.

5. Can you explain “what’s in it for them”?

I was in Sweden working with a county government agency that was completely revamping its health-care system. The leader of this enormous change was proud of the way he had communicated to the county’s residents. They had been given a thorough briefing—the reasons behind the change, the timing of the change and exactly how it was to be carried out. Then he turned to me with a frown and said, “But you know, there is still one question that I get asked all the time.” I interrupted. “Let me guess,” I said. “People want to know if the wait for a doctor’s appointment will be any shorter than it currently is. Am I right?” The man looked startled and asked, “How did you know that?” I told him that I knew to expect that question because it is the one I hear most often about change—“What’s in it for me?”

6. Is your communication “behavior-based”?

Organizations send two concurrent sets of messages about change. One set of messages goes through formal channels of communication—speeches, newsletters, corporate videos, values statements and so forth. The other set of messages is delivered informally through a combination of “off the record” remarks and daily activities. When I coach senior management teams, I begin with two questions: “What do you currently do that already supports the change?” and “What do you have to do differently to align with the change?” For today’s skeptical employee audience, rhetoric without action quickly disintegrates into empty slogans and company propaganda. In the words of Sue Swenson, president of Leap Wireless, “What you do in the hallway is more powerful than anything you say in the meeting room.”

7. Can you paint the big/little picture?

Vision is the big picture (we’ll look at this next), and it is crucial to the success of the enterprise. But along with the big picture, people also need the little picture:

Big Picture—Presenting the concept of transformation.
Little Picture—How are we going to do that?
Big Picture—Setting long-term corporate goals.
Little Picture—Where do we begin?
Big Picture—Developing the overall objectives of the transformation.
Little Picture— What are the priorities?
Big Picture—Creating the mission of the organization.
Little Picture—Where does my contribution fit in?
Big Picture—Communicating organizational values.
Little Picture—What does this mean in my daily life?

8. Is it your vision or our vision?

Leaders understand the power of vision to imbue people with a sense of purpose, direction and energy. A compelling vision of the future pulls people out of the seductive hold of the past and inspires them to set and reach ambitious corporate goals. Of even greater importance is the sense of meaning that people derive from their jobs when they can tie their contributions to the fulfillment of a clear, compelling vision. Leaders must therefore be able to paint the big picture. But if the vision belongs only to top management, it will never be an effective force for transformation. The power of a vision comes truly into play only when the employees themselves have had some part in its creation. So the crucial question becomes, “Whose vision is it?” Leaders must create a master narrative that coherently articulates the company’s identity and ideals and is embraced by every member of the company. If you want employees to feel the same kind of connection to their work that the executives felt at the retreat, then you have to get them involved. Up your leadership skills even further and take our course on Preparing for Leadership: What it Takes to Take the Lead.

9. Are you emotionally literate?

To be a consummate manager of change, it is not enough to engage people’s logic; you also have to appeal to their emotions. As leaders gain the insight that people skills (the “soft stuff” of business) hold the key to organizational change, human emotions take on new significance. Large-scale organizational change almost invariably triggers the same sequence of reactions—denial, negativity, a choice point, tentative acceptance and commitment. Leadership can facilitate this emotional process or, ignored, it can erode the transformation effort.

10. Do you know what shouldn’t change?

The greatest challenge for leaders is to know the difference between what has to be preserved and what needs to be changed. The “genius” of leadership is being able to preserve an organization’s core values, and yet change and adapt as times require. The product of that kind of leadership is an organization that goes on for a very long time.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Carol Kinsey Goman, Ph.D. is an international keynote speaker and executive coach. Her latest book is “STAND OUT: How to Build Your Leadership Presence.” 

From colleague and friend Cody Lorance -

May be an image of Cody C. Lorance, beard and text that says 'DO NOT CONFORM TO THE PATTER THIS WORLD, BUT BE TRANSFORME THE RENEWING OF YOUR MIND. YOU WILL BE ABLE TOTES AND APPROVE WHAT GOD'S WILL IS-HIS GOOD, PLEASING AND PERFECT WILL. ROMANS 12:2'

This was one of the first Bible verses I ever fell in love with pondering. I just enjoy turning it over and over again in my mind. It's lovely.
Doing it today I cannot help but think about it's opposite, which I think is 2 Timothy 4:3.
It is easy to slide into the habit of only listening to those who agree with us. A "good" sermon is usually measured in how many amens it generates and it perhaps should instead be measured by how many cringes.
As a preacher, I understand the feeling. I've preached or taught the Bible hundreds and hundreds of times. It feels good to see the audience agree. It feels bad to see them squirm. It feels worse to make them mad. To alienate.
But if John 6 is any indication ... Or say the preaching of Isaiah (which I have been reading lately) ... It seems like disagreeableness is a more sure mark of sound teaching.
And, well, through the lens of Romans 12, that makes sense. Surrounding myself with people I agree with is never going to renew my mind. It will make me stuck. It's just creating a kind of theological and spiritual bunker around an inevitably limited perspective.
But my bunker... My refuge is supposed to be Jesus. And when I read his word, I constantly cringe.
"Be transformed" is the command.
And it isn't a one time thing.
It was my first fun Greek study to interpret that phrase as "be ye being". Haha... I remember wanting that to be our band name back in the day.
Are you the same as you were a year ago? A decade ago? What can you point to that is a radical transformation of your mind? Do you assume that you arrived at all the really important stuff some years ago?
I don't know.
I never have been satisfied with that.
I remember several years ago preaching one of my "worst" sermons at a New Year's Eve service.
I tried so hard to get the crowd to Amen me. They did occasionally. Mostly when I prompted them. But mostly they just felt uncomfortable.
I have been discouraged about that sermon ever since. It really knocked my confidence.
But, as I look to the last few months of my sabbatical, I think I should stop searching for anyone's amen but God's.

Cody - Thanks for sharing His Work in your ministry.

Phil - Thanks for the special E-mail sharing of this message this morning (Jul 11).

Praise God for Prompting me to share this message with my pastor and church leaders at this particular troubled time. 

24 Discover creative ways to encourage others[a] and to motivate them toward acts of compassion, doing beautiful works as expressions of love.


10:24
 The Aramaic can be translated “Let us look on one another with the excitement of love.”Footnotes



Richard H. Skiba, Jr. said:

Cody - Thanks for sharing His Work in your ministry.

Phil - Thanks for the special E-mail sharing of this message this morning (Jul 11).

Praise God for Prompting me to share this message with my pastor and church leaders at this particular troubled time. 

#ItSeemsToMe...

The fact that the Church has protected core biblical truth while adapting to diverse cultures and different eras is an historical indicator of how the Holy Spirit leads and shapes the Body of Christ across geography and history.

Our rapidly changing times and our radically changing culture are no threat to the Holy Spirit.

We need to constantly strive to be Spirit-led and Scripture-fed.

And pray without ceasing for an increase in faith so that when the Spirit sets a new direction, we have the courage to stop conforming to what we have been doing ... so that ... we become transformed by renewed ways of thinking about the application of Scripture and the design of systems of disciple-making and evangelism. 

Phil Miglioratti

The http://Reimagine.Network



Network Creator / Coordinator said:

24 Discover creative ways to encourage others[a] and to motivate them toward acts of compassion, doing beautiful works as expressions of love.


10:24
 The Aramaic can be translated “Let us look on one another with the excitement of love.”Footnotes



Richard H. Skiba, Jr. said:

Cody - Thanks for sharing His Work in your ministry.

Phil - Thanks for the special E-mail sharing of this message this morning (Jul 11).

Praise God for Prompting me to share this message with my pastor and church leaders at this particular troubled time. 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Blog Posts

Count Your Blessings Daily

Posted by Margie Williamson on November 3, 2011 at 10:33am — 39 Comments

Understanding Discipleship

Posted by Margie Williamson on October 23, 2010 at 2:30pm — 16 Comments

Prayer. Care. Share!

Equip them into the PRAYER-CARE-SHARE LIFE

Disciples of Jesus

Who Make disciples

Who Make Disciples

Who Love God

&

Love Neighbors

© 2021   Created by Network Creator / Coordinator.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service